Shoulder Arthroscopy

Figure 1 –An Arthroscope is small, pencil sized instrument which has specialized fiber-optics with a light at the end.

An Arthroscope is small, pencil sized instrument which has specialized fiber-optics with a light at the end. These fibers beam a light into your joint and this projects a picture back to a television monitor in front of your surgeon. This allows the surgeon to view inside of your shoulder to see what is damaged.

The Arthroscope is placed into your shoulder joint through a small, quarter inch incision called a “portal.” One or two other small incisions or portals are also made which allows your surgeon to insert other instruments inside of your shoulder to see what is damaged.

The Arthroscope is placed into your shoulder going through a small, quarter inch incision called a “portal.” One or two other small incisions or portals are also made which allows your surgeon to insert other instruments inside of your shoulder. These specialized instruments can help remove damaged tissue., smooth rough edges, remove bone spurs, and even repair ligaments or tendons such as the rotator cuff.

These small incisions means less pain after surgery and quicker recovery as compared to open surgery. Almost all patients are allowed to go home the same day of surgery.

Dr. Stetson is at the forefront of treating complex shoulder injuries with the latest arthroscopic techniques.

Watch Dr. Stetson perform a SLAP leison of the shoulder here >>

What are the advantages of shoulder arthroscopy?

Using advanced surgical techniques we can now treat many rotator cuff injuries using the arthroscope. Many rotator cuff injuries can now be fixed using advanced arthroscopic techniques, which means smaller incisions, less pain after surgery, and faster rehabilitation.

To see more information about the shoulder, including video animations of shoulder anatomy and other shoulder injuries and ways to treat them, please click here.

William B. Stetson, MD
Associate Clinical Professor
University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery